Cuisine of Tanzania

According to INSIDEWATCH, the national cuisine of Tanzania is quite traditional for the territory of East Africa. For the most part, it is a mixture of African folk traditions based on the extensive use of plant products in combination with those products, often quite unusual, that can be found in the wild. On the coast, the influence of European cuisine is noticeable, and Zanzibar is famous for its bizarre combination of African, Arabic and Persian culinary traditions. Most dishes are made from various types of meat of wild animals and birds. Beef and pork are traditionally expensive in these places. Tourists are usually offered all sorts of exotic things – antelope fillet, elephant stew, crocodile meat with banana salad, fried warthog side, simmered “nyama-choma” or “mishikaki” meat of all kinds – “nyama-nkombe” (fried beef), “nyama-kuku” (chicken), “nyama-na-ndisi” (meat with stewed bananas), etc. It is worth trying the duck stewed in coconut milk with rice “duckling dar es salaam” (festive dish), roast ostrich with fruit sauce, various pancakes and flatbreads with various fillings, traditional African thick porridge from various grain crops “ugali” (often fried and rolled into balls, and then it goes as a side dish in addition to many meat and vegetable dishes), fried termites or locusts and other local delicacies. For more traditional dishes, we can recommend the local version of grilled chicken, game fried in dough, buffalo steak, chicken soup with green peas, veal stew with vegetables, etc. Various fried sausages, sausages and other meat products fried and smoked over an open fire can be tasted in any establishment, even from street vendors. Bean soup with coconut milk, which is a traditional daily dish of Tanzanians, is also very popular. Corn, legumes, various roots and rice are usually garnished, as well as fried potatoes and salted cabbage. A traditional everyday dish, rather a snack, is dishes based on special unsweetened bananas, which are fried, stewed, baked or simmered in the oven along with meat and peanuts. Indian sauces are very popular, including the famous “curry”, as well as various local spices. Seafood is widely used on the coast. Lemon fried prawns, excellent local lobsters, octopus stew, charcoal grilled sea fish with spices, grilled fish in banana leaves, various shells, including local oysters, and seaweed salad. All restaurants offer a huge selection of fresh fruits and vegetables. Local honey is well-deservedly popular; many sweets are prepared on its basis, the recipe of which obviously has Arabic roots. Flatbreads from various grain crops, “naan” bread are served at the table, and on the coast, traditional Indian “chapati” bread often plays this role (sometimes it is also served for dessert, but in this case the “chapati” flatbreads are repeatedly folded and served with honey, jam or various sweets) or Indian samosa pancakes. Desserts include banana custard cakes, candies (rather candied cakes) “maandazi” and fresh fruit. Of the drinks, the most popular are fresh juices with ice, tea (“tea”, it is usually brewed here “in English” – with milk and sugar) and local coffee of fairly good quality. Tanzania is one of the top five countries – exporters of coffee and tea, so the quality of these drinks is at its best here (unless, of course, it’s not a fake, which you can find a lot here). The country produces many alcoholic beverages. The national drink is light local beer, of which the most popular brands are Safari, Kibo-Gold, Kilimanjaro and Tasker (usually Kenyan). Also in Tanzania they make a very strong cognac gin, good Afrikoko and Amarula liqueurs, as well as Dodoma wines.

Tanzania: Money and currency of Tanzania

Money, CURRENCY Tanzanian shilling (international designation – TZS, within the country – TSh), equal to 100 cents. In circulation are banknotes of 10,000, 5,000, 1,000, 500, and 200 shillings, as well as coins of 100, 50, 20, 10, and 5 cents, as well as 100, 50, 20, 10, 5, and 1 shillings. Banks are open from Monday to Friday from 08:30 to 12:30-16:00, and from 08:30 to 13:00 on Saturday. Currency can be exchanged at banks and exchange offices (“bureaux de change” and “Forex bureaus”). The exchange receipt must be kept before leaving the country. It is not forbidden to change money at street money changers, but in this case the risk of fraud is extremely high. Credit cards have limited circulation. Usually they are accepted only by large banks, supermarkets (especially in port areas) and some travel agencies. In the provinces, paying with a credit card is much more difficult. For the service of withdrawing money from a credit card, some provincial banks charge a commission of 6-8% of the amount. Traveler’s checks can be cashed at registered dealers, banks or money changers (US Dollars or Sterling checks are recommended to avoid fees). A passport is required for cashing out. Often, checks are very carefully checked for authenticity, which takes a lot of time.

Cuisine of Tanzania